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Teaching

Teaching


Advanced Research Design (PhD course)

Course Description

The purpose of this class is to enable doctoral students from the School of International Service to develop and complete a well-written, well-designed, and methodologically sound research proposal. This research proposal will form the basis for students’ dissertation prospectuses as well as funding proposals that most doctoral students submit during their tenure at SIS.


Project Design, Monitoring, and Evaluation (MA course)

Course Description

This introductory course aims to help students understand how to monitor and evaluate development, humanitarian, or peacebuilding projects. The course will focus on enabling students to apply the concepts that they learn, including by critically assessing projects and identifying the most appropriate approach to monitoring and evaluation. Each student will choose one project to work with for the entirety of the class and, by the end of the class, produce a Monitoring and Evaluation Assessment and Design for that project.


Unpacking Intervention in Civil War (MA course)

Course Description

Western scholars and policymakers often draw stark distinctions between peacekeeping, peacemaking, conflict prevention, peacebuilding, development, counter-insurgency, and humanitarian intervention. In conflict-affected countries, however, these distinctions are blurred, as single organizations, such as UN peace operations, simultaneously attempt to build peace, prevent violence, save lives, and create the foundations for sustainable development. This course will take an actor-centric perspective, focusing on the political, legal, and organizational causes of the behavior of international organizations, non-governmental organizations, states, and private contractors during civil war. After taking this course, students will be able to assess the behavior and potential effectiveness of key international interveners engaged in peacekeeping, conflict-sensitive development, peacebuilding, and humanitarian intervention.


Intervention in Civil War (Undergraduate course)

Course Description

Western scholars and policymakers often draw stark distinctions between peacekeeping, peacemaking, conflict prevention, peacebuilding, development, counter-insurgency, and humanitarian intervention. In conflict-affected countries, however, these distinctions are blurred, as single organizations, such as UN peace operations, simultaneously attempt to build peace, prevent violence, save lives, and create the foundations for sustainable development. This course will take an actor-centric perspective, focusing on the political, legal, and organizational causes of the behavior of international organizations, non-governmental organizations, states, and private contractors during civil war. After taking this course, students will be able to assess the behavior and potential effectiveness of key international interveners engaged in peacekeeping, conflict-sensitive development, peacebuilding, and humanitarian intervention.