Past Funding

Past Funding

AIDING PEACE?
DONOR BEHAVIOR IN CONFLICT AFFECTED COUNTRIES

Donor: Swiss Network for International Studies (SNIS)
Duration: January 2014 – June 2016

The objective of this research project is to understand the causes of donor behavior at the sub-national level during a peace process. Do donors respond to the ebbs and flows of a peace process or is their behavior motivated by other factors that are exogenous to events within the conflict-torn country? The literatures on international aid, peacebuilding, and peace processes have thus far failed to answer this question.

The project employs an innovative multi-method research design to answer these questions. It uses a nested case study approach, which allows us to compare the behavior of different types of donors (i.e., bilateral, multilateral, OECD and non-OECD, Regional Development Banks, etc.) in three relatively contemporaneous peace processes (i.e., Liberia, Nepal, and Sudan).

The research team, made up of political scientists and economists, has a very strong background in international aid, conflict-affected countries, peace processes, sub-national comparative analyses, and rigorous quantitative and qualitative methods. The dissemination events and discussions that the team will hold with its project partners and contacts will ensure that the research findings are made available to help improve donor behavior in conflict-affected countries.

Team Members

Susanna Campbell, Principal Investigator

Jean-Louis Arcand, Co-Principal Investigator

Michael Findley, Co-Principal Investigator

Gabriele Spilker, Research Collaborator

Judith Vorrath, Research Collaborator

Josiah Marineau, Research Collaborator

Bradley Parks, Collaborator

Achim Wennmann, Collaborator

Funds Raised

US$ 240,000


Bad Behavior?
Explaining the Performance of International Peacebuilding Organizations

Donor: Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)
Duration: November 2013 – October 2015

The project has two concrete objectives. First, it will test and refine a theory developed by Dr. Susanna Campbell that explains IO, INGO and bilateral donor performance in war-to-peace transitions, with the ultimate aim of creating a generalizable theory. Second, it will expand on her work undertaken so far to cover different regional organizations engaged in peacebuilding. In order to achieve their research objectives, Dr. Susanna Campbell and Prof. Stephanie Hofmann will combine their extensive academic knowledge and field research experience, and jointly study various case study organizations over a ten to fifteen year period in two countries: Haiti and Liberia. The focal point of analysis will therefore be country-level offices of IOs, INGOs, and government aid agencies that have a clearly specified peacebuilding aims, within these two countries.

The findings from this project have significance for the theoretical debates within International Relations on the performance of IOs, INGOs, and donor aid agencies and the role of accountability, legitimacy, informal institutions, and institutional change therein. It will also shed light on the effectiveness of current policies and tools intended to improve peacebuilding performance, and provide a potentially important framework for peacebuilding organizations to assess and improve their positive contribution to post-war transitions.

Team Members

Stephanie Hofmann, Principal Investigator

Susanna Campbell, Co-Principal Investigator

Funds Raised

US$ 270,000


Crowdsourcing Peace:
Closing the Feedback Loop in War-to-Peace Transitions

Donor: Center on Conflict and Development, Texas A&M University
Duration: August 2014 – November 2014

How can donors close the feedback loop between themselves and local institutions in war-to-peace transitions? Donors often do not understand how their behavior positively or negatively affects the dynamics within countries emerging from civil war. They often lack real relationships with the communities that they aim to serve, failing to receive regular feedback from them about the evolution of the country’s local level dynamics. Instead, donors monitor conflict and cooperation among elites without engaging local institutions and the diverse perspectives of the country’s population.

The lack of direct feedback from conflict-affected populations undermines donors’ understanding of the relationship between their aid allocation strategies and the evolution of a country’s war-to-peace transition. We argue that geocoded aid data and information communications technologies, such as crowdsourcing, can help donor agencies to keep on top of a dynamic political context, engage with community members and local institutions, and respond quickly to information that is presented in clear maps. Geocoding of the aid given by donors, crowdsourcing that enables populations to ‘speak’ directly to donors, and the visualization of this data through maps together create a powerful approach to enable donors to better understand the relationship between their aid and the evolution of a country’s war-to-peace transition. Better informed donors will, hopefully, be better able have a more positive influence on these dynamics.

Team Members

Susanna Campbell, Co-Principal Investigator

Michael Findley, Co-Principal Investigator

Funds Raised

US$ 24,600


Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of the UN Peacebuilding Fund in Burundi 2007-2013

Donor: UN Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO) and the PBF Joint Steering Committee (JSC) in Burundi
Duration: October 2013 – January 2014

Between 2007 and 2013, the UN Peacebuilding Fund (PBF) allocated US$ 44 million from their Peacebuilding and Recovery Facility (PRF) and US$ 5 million from their Immediate Response Facility (IRF) to help consolidate peace in Burundi. This makes Burundi the top recipient of PBF funds out of the 23 countries that the PBF has supported. Burundi was also one of the first two countries, along with Sierra Leone, to receive PBF funding and be included on the agenda of the UN Peacebuilding Commission (PBC). The duration and magnitude of the PBF’s support to Burundi make it an important case to study and understand.

This evaluation is different from the other evaluations that the PBF has commissioned because it assesses the contribution of the PBF support to Burundi’s post-war transition for the entire period of PBF support to Burundi (2007 – 2013), which included two tranches of PBF funding (PBF I and PBF II) and the preparation of a third one (PBF III), and draws lessons for the PBF based on its support over this entire period. The same lead evaluator that evaluated the first PBF tranche in 2010 also led this evaluation, enabling the evaluation team to conduct an in-depth comparison of PBF support in different sectors, with different staff, and to different configurations of the UN at the country level. To do this, the evaluation employed an innovative research design that is grounded in a household-level survey of over 250 households from randomly sampled towns with and without PBF involvement, and over 165 semi-structured interviews, 90 of which are drawn from the randomly sampled towns, as well as a detailed document review. This evaluation was conducted by a team of thirteen researchers and research assistants.

Team Leader

Susanna Campbell, Principal Investigator

Team Members

Anne Marie Bihirabake, Tracy Dexter, Prof. Michael Findley, Prof. Stephanie Hofmann, Josiah Marineau, René Manirakiza, and Daniel Walker

Funds Raised

US$ 52,000

Downloads

Final Report
Supplemental Annex

 


Evaluation of UN Peacebuilding Fund in Burundi (2007-2009)

Evaluation of first tranche from UN Peacebuilding Fund to Burundi

Donor: United Nations Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO)
Duration: October 2009 – December 2009
Independent external evaluation of the relevance, efficiency, and effectiveness of $35 million provided by the UN Peacebuilding Fund to the United Nations System in Burundi, between 2007 and 2009.

Team Leader

Susanna Campbell, Principal Investigator

Team Members

Justine Nkurunziza and Leonard Kayobera

Funds Raised

Funding raised: US$ 35,000

Downloads

Final Report


Evaluation of Burundi Leadership Training Program (BLTP)

Donor: World Bank Post-Conflict Fund
Duration: May – August 2004

Independent external evaluation of the Burundi Leadership Training Program (BLTP), a training and dialogue project run by Dr. Howard Wolpe of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (WWICS).

Team Members

Peter Uvin, Principal Investigator

Susanna Campbell, Co-Principal Investigator

Funds Raised

US$ 40,000

Downloads

Download Report